Submerged Model T Should Kick-Start Our Imaginations

Paranoia runs high throughout society these days. Many worry about who knows what about them, not acknowledging the information they are scared others may know probably comes from their own postings on their selected social media profiles. There’s a more fun paranoia to embrace, though.

It has been reported across the Twin Cities media landscape that below the Mississippi River near Winona, an antique Model T is submerged underneath the waters. The classic Ford was first located on October 9 via sonar. Three weeks later a dive team was set in and discovered the Model T is located anywhere from 150-200 feet off the shore. It appears the car is about half covered by the sand and muck of the Mississippi River bottom.

The car is at least 86 years old and it won’t be known how long the Model T has been in the river until it’s eventual recovery. Which begs the question: what else is in our backyard  that we don’t know it’s there?

Let’s not be so straight-lined that we instantly think about the pollutants and the toxins and the bad things that could be in the air and our water supply. Leave those dreary topics for a dreary day. No, let’s let our minds wander and imagine what wonderful things possibly could be in the bottom of our own favorite rivers.

The possibilities are virtually endless, right? A Model T, a huge motor vehicle, has been at the bottom of the Mississippi River in close proximity to a pretty populated area and nobody ever came across it. Treasure chests filled with Honus Wagner baseball cards, million dollar bills and rare Playboys could all be at the bottom of the river or deep in the wooded forests.

Wander with me. Let you imagination go. Go to a world of make believe. Anything that you could dream of could be right under our feet and we just don’t know it.

Our imaginations tend to start to leave us behind as we, as humans, get older and allegedly mature. Maybe, just maybe, if we let ourselves believe there are buried treasures in the bottom of the river, we can find childhood happiness in our adult world.

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